Friday, December 2, 2016

Yun Gee in The San Franciscan

The San Franciscan
December 1926

One of Our Moderns
By Aline Kistler

A tousled-headed boy from Canton. An eager adolescent who came to San Francisco four years ago and now, at the age of twenty, joins the starvelings in art and follows his participation in the opening exhibit at the new Modern Gallery, in Montgomery street, with a one-man show that has attracted keen attention.

That is Yun. Yun what? we ask. “Just Yun—that is all the name that is really mine and belongs to me alone,” says this amazing youngster with the interesting accent and eager ideas.

And his art? It is not amateurish—although Yun has painted less than a year—but it is young. Young in its enthusiasms and pseudo-restraints, those self-imposed limitations that emphasize the essential orgy of his discoveries in color and form. Young in the eagerness soon to be mocked by sophistication. Young in its eager display of all he has to give.

And here the exhibition betrays its artist for its seventy-three pieces include drawings that should never have left the work room, sketches useful only to the artist himself in the process of analysis or, possibly, years later to the dealer who capitalizes on the indiscriminate worship given anything touched by a hand that has won fame for its master. These drawings are, for the most part, meaningless and vague—mere imaginative trailings. Exception to this damning is given in the case of the drawing called “Strollers,” a succession of broadside strokes that give a feeling of movement and rhythm.

Yun’s paintings, on the other hand, are mostly well thought out even though many seem mere haphazard conglomerations at first. It is the essential feeling of design and the conscious placing of color that brings second glance meaning out of first sight chaos.

Yun calls his color tones “notes” in the music of his design. He earnestly insists that he paints a music that wells up from his heart. He points to a succession of warm color strokes and likens them to violin tones. He calls attention to other definite color placings and speaks of harmonies that he hears as he paints.

Whatever the mechanism, the results approach the studied design that forms the backbone of all true art and, whatever the method, the end would seem to point toward a productive maturity.

At present, Yun is dominated by the ideal of the futurists. He conceives form as crystalline. He sees in surfaces not their own colors but the colors they reflect. Thus his “Venus—Blue Body” becomes a series of facets reflecting cold or warm light according to the plane each represents. The structure so achieved becomes intelligible and meaningful.

So, too, his “Sunday Morning” resolves itself, from being merely a pleasing pattern of color, into an interpretive study of figures on a park bench. And subtly but surely he has caught the emotional tone, the dull repose of the bench habitues.

“My Impression of the Christ” was shown first in the group exhibit, along with the work of the nine other young artists who are sponsoring the Modern Gallery. It was heralded by the press as a synthetic representation. Some contended that it gave three aspects of the personality and labeled the respectively, Santa Claus, Shakespeare, and the conventional Christ. Yun disclaims any such intent, saying that the succession of heads in the composite picture is his way of showing vital movement, as he does not think of the Christ as ever static.

Visitors at the Gallery read cynicism and disillusionment into the painting buy Yun approaches it reverently, almost worshipfully, for the coming of Christianity into his life was a momentous thing. He says that his first desire to paint came when, as a child, he wanted to make a picture of the Christ.

Yun claims to belong to no “school” of art. He attributes his art to no teacher or external influence. He would have us believe that he paints what he sees the way that he feels it— as a child would put down his impressions. He would have us feel with him the “rhythm” o[f] his heart.

And we smile—unkindly nor in ridicule but merely because we remember—and we wonder what maturity will bring.

(click image to enlarge)























(Next post on Friday: Eugene Kinn Choy, Student)

Friday, November 25, 2016

Paul Fung in Motion Picture World

The Motion Picture World
December 1, 1917
Roundup of Cartoonists
Universal Current Events Claims to Have Captured Thirty-nine Funny Men.

Universal Current Events, which recently inaugurated the policy of recreating newspaper cartoons for the first time in the history of the screen, announces that it has just completed its roster of cartoonists whose work is exclusively presented by it in the motion picture theaters. The list is a remarkable one, inasmuch as it includes practically famous cartoonist of nearly every leading newspaper in the United States. Here, for the first time, is given a list of the names of the men and papers participating in this epochal screen achievement:

W. A. Rogers, New York Herald; W. C. Morris, New York Evening Mail; Robert Carter, Philadelphia Press; Charles Henry Sykes, Philadelphia Evening Ledger; R. K. Chamberlain, Philadelphia Evening Telegraph; F. T. Richards, Philadelphia North American; John L. DeMar, Philadelphia Record; Fred Morgan, Philadelphia Inquirer; Nelson Harding, Brooklyn, N. Y.. Eagle; Ted Brown, Chicago Daily News; “Cy” Hungerford, Pittsburgh Sun; Bert Link. Pittsburgh Press; Elmer Donnell, St. Louis Globe-Democrat; Claude Shafer, Cincinnati Post; W. A. Ireland, Columbus Evening Dispatch; Harry J. Westerman, Ohio State Journal; Harry Keys, Columbus Citizen; J. H. Donahey, Cleveland Plain Dealer; James Lavery, Cleveland Press; Fred O. Seibel, Albany Knickerbocker Press; Wm. A. McKenna, Albany Evening Journal; W. K. Patrick, New Orleans Times-Picayune; Lute Rease, Newark Evening News; Alfred W. Browerton, Atlanta Journal; Lewis C. Gregg, Atlanta Constitution; “Cad” Brand, Milwaukee; Sentinel; Gaar Williams, Indianapolis News; Cornelius J. Kennedy (“Ken”), Buffalo Evening News; R. O. Evans, Baltimore American; G. R. Spencer, Omaha World-Herald; J. P. Alley, Memphis Commercial Appeal; Paul B. Fung, Seattle Post-Intelligencer; John F. Knott, Dallas News; James J. Lynch, Denver Rocky Mountain News; Paul A. Plaschke. Louisville Times; McKee Barclay, Baltimore Sun; Walter Blackman, Birmingham Age Herald; A. J. Taylor, Los Angeles Times; Roy Aymond, New Orleans Daily States.























(Next post on Friday: Yun Gee in The San Franciscan)

Friday, November 18, 2016

Paul Fung in The Editor & Publisher

The Editor & Publisher
September 8, 1917
Famous Chinese Cartoonist Depicts a Tragedy

Here you have Paul Fung’s idea of a “Little Tragedy of a Newspaper Office.”

Paul Fung, cartoonist for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, is believed to be the only Chinese cartoonist who is member of an American newspaper staff. He has a national reputation as a cartoonist, illustrator and painter. He is a regular contributor to many of the big weekly and monthly magazines of the country and his work in the Post-Intelligencer is widely reprinted.

Paul Fung was born in Seattle twenty years ago. At the age of five years his father, a minister, took him to China to make a preacher out of him. He attended a Chinese school for six years. at the age of eleven he became ambitious to become an artist. As a boy he would paint cherry blossoms and flowers on Chinese fans. He would walk about Canton for hours at a time, making sketches of different things he saw. At first his work was very crude, but he was ambitious and determined, and he continued on. Finally he succeeded in selling some of his work in China. That encouraged him.

His father was persistent in his efforts to make a minister out of him. But the pulpit held no charms for Paul. Father soon learned that and brought his son back to the United States. That was when Paul was twelve years of ago. In this country he went to grade school first and them to high school. While in high school he applied to the Post-Intelligencer for a job.

It is less than two years ago that an abbreviated Chinese boy, who looked as though he had just shed his knickerbockers and annexed a complete young man’s outfit, slowly and quietly made his way through the door leading to the editorial rooms of the Post-Intelligencer. Under his left arm was a portfolio, and the edges of white cardboard protruded from both sides.

Paul happened to drop into the office when every one was terribly busy. He soon learned that and learned also that no one had time to see him. But Paul was not discouraged. He wasn’t going anywhere. He had plenty of tim. so, he sat down and waited and waited. Several hours later, Tom Dillon, managing editor, walked out of his office and noted that there was some one waiting to see him.

“What’s troubling you son?” asked Mr. Dillon, smiling all the time. “Come in.”

Paul was encouraged at this display of cordiality after having been neglected so long. He had his recitation all framed in advance. He had rehearsed it many times, and he delivered it well. He exhibited his sketches and cartoons.

Mr. Dillon was impressed with the determination and ambition of Paul and, besides, he need an illustrator, so he told Mr. Fung he would give him a chance. He instructed him to report for work the following day. Paul was there, long before there was anything to do. When he was given his first task he threw all of his talents and energy into the work. The result was highly satisfactory. That was the beginning of Paul’s career as a cartoonist.

Paul Fung is very human. He is a good newspaper man. He has many friends and all of them value his friendship. He possesses the American point of view and has a real sense of humor. His cartoons are excellent.

 






















(Next post on Friday: Paul Fung in Motion Picture World)

Friday, October 21, 2016

Rose Quong in the News, 1925–1959

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
May 19, 1925
A Melbourne Actress

The Sydney Morning Herald
(Australia)
July 21, 1928
London Chat. Mme. Ada Crossley and Others

The Glasgow Herald
(Scotland)
March 16, 1929
London Theaters
“The Circle of Chalk”
Screen Actress [Anna May Wong] in Chinese Play

The Sydney Morning Herald
(Australia)
October 6, 1933
Australians in London.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
February 20, 1934
A Line on Liners

The New York Times
February 21, 1934
‘Forgotten Women’ Luncheon
…Later there will be a program by Rose Quong, well-known Chinese diseuse, in costume.

The Montreal Gazette
(Canada)
February 22, 1934
Chinese Outlook on Life Pictured

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
February 23, 1934
About People

The Sydney Morning Herald
(Australia)
February 23, 1934
General Cable News.

The New York Times
February 25, 1934
Unemployed Women Will Gain by Benefit
…In conjunction with the luncheon there will be a program by Rose Quong, Chinese diseuse, who will present character sketches in costumes of the East and West.

The New York Times
February 25, 1934
Society for Ethical Culture, Central Park West and Sixty-fourth Street—Morning, lecture by Miss Rose Quong on “The Philosophy and Religion of China.”

The New York Times
February 28, 1934
Idle Women Aided by Literary Group
…speakers were…Rose Quong

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
April 17, 1934
Mrs. Jeremiah R. Van Brunt Hostess to
National Hymn Sing Association at Her Home

The Sydney Morning Herald
(Australia)
July 21, 1934
General Cable News.

The Tuscaloosa News
(Alabama)
July 30, 1934
A Gotham Rambler Picks Up a Few Odds and Ends

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
September 22, 1934
All Faiths Service for Jewish Feast

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
September 28, 1934
Many Here Await All Faith Rally

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
September 29, 1934
Plan Service with All Faiths Participating

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
September 30, 1934
Unite for Service of All Faiths

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
October 5, 1934
Faith Fellowship Branch Organized at Plymouth Rally

The Milwaukee Journal
(Wisconsin)
October 12, 1934
Noted Engineer, Professors to Speaks to Woman’s Club

The New York Times
October 28, 1934
Alien Drive Urged on Women’s Clubs
…Miss Rose Quong, a Chinese, will be the principal speaker.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
November 4, 1934
State Federation

The Milwaukee Journal
(Wisconsin)
November 11, 1934
Shows China in Dramatic Sketch Here

The New York Times
November 13, 1934
Clubwomen Urged to Aid Crime Drive
…Miss Rose Quong, an actress born in Australia of Chinese parents, was the artist presented.

Schenectady Gazette
(New York)
November 19, 1934
Women’s Clubs State Conclave Huge Success

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
July 13, 1935
Australian Wins Fame Abroad.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
September 15, 1935
Community Club

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
January 12, 1936
Garden City Clubs

The New York Times
January 7, 1936
Rose Quong Here for Tour
Rose Quong, Chinese actress born in Australia, who has made a success on the stage in Melbourne and London, arrived yesterday from England on the Cunard White Star liner Franconia to make a tour of the United States in a one-woman show depicting the culture, wit and philosophy of China.

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
February 4, 1936
Australian Travellers Return.

Chinese Digest
April 3, 1936
page 5: Chinese Actress in Recital

Chinese Digest
April 17, 1936
page 5: Rose Quong to Give Talk

Chinese Digest
April 24, 1936
page 4: Interpreter of China Delights Audience

Chinese Digest
May 1, 1936
page 3: Miss Quong to Lecture

Chinese Digest
May 8, 1936
page 5: Rose Quong Presented to San Francisco

Chinese Digest
May 15, 1936
page 4: Miss Quong Has China Day

Chinese Digest
May 22, 1936
page 6: Miss Gee Honors Miss Quong

Chinese Digest
May 29, 1936
page 6: Rose Quong China Bound

Chicago Tribune
(Illinois)
October 4, 1936
Chinese Noblewoman Guests at Mrs. Calhoun’s Luncheon

Chinese Digest
October 9, 1936
page 4: Rose Quong Returns

Chinese Digest
October 23, 1936
page 5: Rose Quong at International House

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
(New York)
October 27, 1938
Miss Kenyon to Open Women’s Lecture Series

Berkeley Daily Gazette
(California)
October 28, 1936
Chinese Actress to Give Program at University

The Montreal Gazette
(Canada)
December 15, 1936
Fealty to King George VI. Coupled with Grief
at Edward’s Abdication

The Sydney Morning Herald
(Australia)
February 18, 1937
Heard Here and There
see column 6

The New York Times
May 21, 1930
Institute Program List 40 Speakers
Talks on Economic, Social and Cultural Topics Scheduled by Women’s Council
The speaker’s will be…Miss Rose Quong from China.

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
June 6, 1939
Anna May Wong

Brooklyn Eagle
(New York)
February 25, 1940
Theater Club

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
March 27, 1940
Three Women

The New York Times
March 31, 1940
Tuesday
College Club of White Plains—Meeting, Contemporary Club, 8:15 P/M/ Miss Rose Quong, speaker on “The Soul of China.”

Brooklyn Eagle
(New York)
December 8, 1940
The Chinese Theater

The New York Times
December 8, 1940
Friday
Century Theatre Club—Meeting, Hotel Commodore. Rose Quong, speaker.

The New York Times
March 3, 1941
Casting Items
Rose Quong for “The Circle of Chalk.”

The New York Times
March 25, 1941
News of the Stage
Another opening tonight, this one off Broadway, is “The Circle of Chalk,” at the New School for Social Research, 66 West Twelfth Street, under the auspices of the Studio Theatre…. Derived from the Chinese, James Laver has translated the play, which is based on an adaptation by Klabund, the pseudonym of Alfred Henscjke….A cast of eighteen is headed by Dolly Haas and Rose Quong….

The New York Times
March 27, 1941
“The Circle of Chalk” reviewed by Brooks Atkinson.
…As Mrs. Ma, first wife of the rich tax collector, Rose Quong gives an excellent performance of coarse and cruel duplicity….

Brooklyn Eagle
(New York)
March 29, 1941
Chinese Actress

Brooklyn Eagle
(New York)
December 19, 1941
‘Lady’ Cast Is Now Complete

The New York Times
December 19, 1941
More performers for “Portrait of a Lady”: Ruth Thane McDevitt, Austin Fairman and Rose Quong. Edwin Gordon will be stage manager.

The New York Times
January 5, 1942
News of the Stage
With the deletion in Boston of the parts originally played by Morgan Farley, Rose Quong and Jean Mann, “Portrait of a Lady,” starring Ruth gordon, will be exhibited this week in Philadelphia….

Brooklyn Eagle
(New York)
January 7, 1942
Less to Say Now

The Pelham Sun
(New York)
April 17, 1942
Rose Quong to Speak at Manor Club Luncheon
Anglo-Chinese Actress, in Native Costume Will Speak on Chinese Culture at President’s Luncheon.

Rose Quong, distinguished Anglo-Chinese actress, will speak at the president’s luncheon which will be held at the Manor Club on Tuesday afternoon.

“From disunity and discord, how may we arrive eventually at a collective peace,” Miss Quong asks in her talk on “Oriental Keys to Life and Power.” She interprets the message of the wise men of the Bast to the people of the West comparing the teachings of Christ to those of Confucius, Buddha and Lao-Tse. Dressed in native costume, the charming actress speaks with exquisite diction and philosophical insight that has won for her recognition in the courts of Europe. Born in Australia of Chinese parents, Rose Quong has learned to combine Oriental and Occidental cultures and has made as her specialty as an actress interpretation of Shakespeare.

Brooklyn Eagle
(New York)
May 7, 1942
Carroll Club to Hear Chinese Author

The New York Times
May 17, 1942
N.J. Federation to Vote on Status
…Other speakers on aspects of the war during the convention will be…Miss Rose Quong, Chinese actress, on “Unconquerable China.”

The New York Times
May 22, 1942
Curbs on Gasoline Hits Clubwomen
…Other speakers were…Rose Quong…

The New York Times
October 17, 1943
Women to Discuss Post-War Europe
…Speaknig at the broadcast session of the conference will be…Miss Rose Quong…

Chicago Tribune
(Illinois)
August 6, 1944
Joliet Artists’ League Show a Fine Exhibit

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
May 10, 1947
People and Parties

The Age
(Melbourne, Australia)
May 29, 1953
Basso Looks for Spirit of Song

The Tuscaloosa News
(Alabama)
June 12, 1959
Old Game


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(Next post on Friday: Chinese Wit, Wisdom and Written Characters)